From the computer screen to the lab bench: A physicist learns to do wet-lab biology

As Kenneth described in a recent post, the Center for Integrated Proteomics Research and the BioMaPS Institute for Quantitative Biology at Rutgers recently held a two-week “boot camp” program to cover a range of basic topics in molecular biology and biophysics.  The program was intended to serve the increasingly diverse community of scientists — with backgrounds ranging from physics and chemistry to computer science and mathematics — working in quantitative biology.

As a physics graduate student who works in the BioMaPS Institute, I was definitely in the target demographic.  In my undergraduate days I was mainly interested in particle physics and cosmology, so my coursework focused entirely on physics and mathematics.  I haven’t taken a biology or chemistry course since high school.  While I’ve certainly picked up a great deal of the necessary biology throughout my graduate research in biophysics, I could still use more breadth.

But I was primarily interested in gaining a very specific kind of breadth from the boot camp.  Besides having a background in physics, I am also a theorist by training, and I’d never had any experience doing “wet-lab” biology experiments.  (In physics, there is a very clear divide between theorists and experimentalists.)  But recently I’ve become interested in gaining some experience with wet-lab biology, both because it’s helpful for collaborating with experimentalists and understanding experimental papers, but also because there is a serious possibility I will pursue a combination of theoretical and experimental work next year as a postdoc.  Luckily, the boot camp included a week-long experimental lab for complete beginners like me, so it seemed like the perfect opportunity to try it out.

The best thing about having zero experience with something is that you can learn a whole lot really quickly.  So even the most basic, mundane aspects of doing the lab were new and exciting for me, things I had heard about in talks or read in papers but never really understood.  So this is how you pipette…and “streak a plate”…and purify proteins…and run a gel…and so on.  Here’s some photographic evidence (credit to Gail Ferstandig Arnold):

As someone who has worked only on the other side of research until now, it has been really eye-opening to have concrete experience doing experiments and generating data that previously existed only as abstractions in my theorist’s mind.  While I recognize that a week’s worth of exposure isn’t enough for me to jump right into doing all my own experiments as a postdoc — undoubtedly I’ll have to relearn all the stuff from last week again later — getting that first experience definitely gives me confidence for the future.

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