3D Printing at Rutgers

Since I am going to be using 3D printing as part of my research, I’ve been on the lookout for places to print at Rutgers for quite some time. If you’re also interested to do some 3D printing for your research, or you just want to 3D print something for fun, then I have come across a number of options that might be useful for you. I’m sure there might be even more locations available. So, if you happen to know of any other locations that allow for open use of printers, please let me know.

  1. Douglass Library, Fordham Commons area Fablab, Douglass Campus: on the ground level of the library are two MakerBot Replicator 2’s and computers with design software. You can schedule an appointment to print your project and to get pricing estimates.
  2. Rutgers Makerspace, 35 Berrue Circle, Livingston Campus: MakerBot Replicators and other fun items, like a pool table, are available here. The Makerspace normally has regular drop in hours for printing or just hanging out. The space is run by Rick Andersen who has lots of experience in computers and electronics including web design, Arduino and soldering.
  3. Rutgers Mechanical Engineering Dept., Busch Campus: the department has a few options available for Rutgers affiliates to use, including a Stratasys Objet350 Connex and Stratasys uPrint SE. The contact person for setting up an appointment to get your projects printed and for pricing is John Petrowski (petrows@rci.rutgers.edu).
  4. FUBAR Labs, Highland Park, NJ: Fair Use Building and Research (FUBAR) Labs is a nonprofit that provides a local spot for people with common interests, usually in science and technology, to meet and collaborate. It’s an open community offering classes, workshops, study groups, and long term project collaboration. You can join as a member for 24/7 use of the space, or you can drop by for one of their events to check them out.

On the Digital Humanities

I recently attended a talk sponsored by the MLIS Colloquium Speaker Series at Rutgers University titled “Digital Humanities: New Roles for Libraries.”  The panel consisted of a diverse group of Digital Humanities scholars, staff, librarians, and specialists who discussed a broad range of topics ranging from an overview of the Digital Humanities to the specific roles of the various members of the panel.  As a PhD student in the Humanities, it was fascinating to learn about the general role of the Digital Humanities as well as the role they can play in my own scholarship.  The panel allowed me to consider the benefits of this kind of technology in academia, and to think about scholarship in ways that I had not previously thought about it.  In the following paragraphs, I intend to share my learning experience with you!

Perhaps an obvious, but very important aspect of the Digital Humanities is that it allows us to conduct research remotely.  The example provided was the Jazz Oral History Project at Rutgers – a project devoted to the recording and digitization of the oral history of jazz musicians and their profession.  By digitizing the oral history interviews, we are able to access these materials from any location, thus eliminating the need to travel to conduct research.

The most interesting aspect about this project, however, is the notion that it changes the way we study history.  We are no longer simply memorizing important people and eventful dates, but instead listening to and learning from the seminal figures that lived this history and are providing us with the opportunity to rewrite it.  As one of the panelists stated, we are experiencing history through storytelling, arguably more exciting than the traditional experience we are used to.

I think the greatest potential of the Digital Humanities lies in the opportunity for collaboration.  Digital Humanities librarians are able to work with scholars from many different departments of the university.  Furthermore, the Digital Humanities can bring together researchers from two seemingly disparate fields, such as Foreign Languages and Computer Science.  This allows for various networking and professional exchanges, but it also provides the opportunity to consider your research from different and multidisciplinary perspectives.  I believe this is especially relevant in today’s academic world; STEM disciplines and the Humanities are often at odds with each other, but it is truly in our best interests to narrow the gap between the two and take advantage of the chance to collaborate.

The Digital Humanities will undoubtedly continue to evolve and prove to be a valuable tool in academic research.  In a world of continual scholarly production across multiple disciplines, the Digital Humanities allows us to engage in both technical and creative endeavors, providing us the opportunity to expand our work and the collective knowledge of humanity in previously unthinkable ways.

Biological Science Boot Camp: Bridging Theory and Experiment

Society is a complex network of people needing to effectively communicate. To advance the standard of living, it is imperative that communication exists between people who articulate different perspectives and work towards a common goal.  For example, teams of medical workers are needed to deliver healthcare, groups of politicians are required to debate public policy, and teams of scientists are vital in every branch of society.

In many instances, the complex nature of society requires scientists, politicians, and medical workers to work towards a shared goal. For this to occur, ideas need to be communicated effectively. Medical workers need to know the expected impact of a life saving drug developed by scientists, and politicians need to determine if the new drug meets regulatory policies.

Before a drug can be put in the hands of trained personnel, a team of scientists with diverse expertise in experimentation and theory need to design and thoroughly test the drug. However, theorists may not have the background to understand the limitations of experiments, and experimentalists may not have the theoretical background to simulate and model data. Effective communication and collaboration can bridge the gap between theorists and experimentalists.

This winter break, I am bridging the gaps in my science by attending the intensive two week interdisciplinary boot camp offered by the Rutgers Center for Integrative Proteomics Research. The boot camp offers an immersive experience for scientists interested in finding potential collaborators, and learning new methods, for exploring theoretical and experimental biology. The main tool being used to teach the many aspects of biology is the Green Fluorescent Protein, a Nobel Prize winning subject important for the advancement of biological science. This boot camp is offered Jan. 6-17, 2014, and is open to all.  For more information click here

Alternative Summer Experiences

I have been very fortunate during my graduate school years to explore alternative options for my summers besides remaining in the research lab, working on my thesis, and teaching summer courses. These experiences have allowed me to develop skills and to network with people I would not have had access to otherwise.  I spent two summers on these “alternative” options taking a break from teaching and research.

The first type of alternative summer was early in my graduate career when I attended a course at the Marine Biological Laboratory or MBL in Woods Hole, MA.   Woods Hole is where famous life scientists go to play, learn, and teach the next generations of scientists during the summer break.  The Woods Hole website calls it “a salty sea spray village that brings the Nobel Laureate and the fisherman together in harmony.”  Of the several courses offered at the MBL, I was lucky enough to be admitted into the Microbial Diversity Course, a 6.5 week intensive crash course on all things microbiological.  We spent the first few weeks attending morning lectures followed by exploration of local fresh and saltwater marshes, bogs, and streams in an attempt to culture the various resident microorganisms.  The second half of the course was spent developing individual mini projects and additional instruction by world-renowned scientists.  However, it was not all work and no play as the scientists and students would mingle at the local beaches and bars in the afternoons and evenings.  I was also able to visit Martha’s Vineyard and go whale watching off the Cape Cod Coast.  This course and courses like it give students the opportunity to interact with other students and scientists from around the world, greatly enriching our scientific development in ways that are not possible if we do not venture off-campus.

This past summer I decided to experience something completely different from the normal bench work associated with microbiology.  I applied and was accepted to the U.S. Department of State’s Internship Program as a Student Intern.  I was placed in the Office of the Science and Technology Adviser to the Secretary (STAS) in Washington, DC for a 10 -week period.  In this office I was surrounded by science PhDs who were using their knowledge to further U.S. international relations in regards to science policy and science diplomacy.  My responsibilities included drafting talking points, updating program information, and initiating a memorandum of understanding between State and a non-governmental entity.  I was free to attend numerous meetings, seminars and lectures within the State department and the surrounding DC area that caught my interest.  I worked on one initiative, the NeXXt Scholars Program and a research project on the Benefits of International Research Collaboration.  The NeXXt Scholars Program was initiated to increase the number of women from Muslim majority countries coming to the U.S. to pursue undergraduate degrees in STEM fields.  This was achieved by partnering with New York Academy of Sciences and U.S. women’s colleges.  Rutgers Douglass Residential College is one of the 38 women’s colleges that participates in the program.  During this internship I was learning how to apply the professional skills I was developing during my PhD training such as project management, organization, communication, and writing.  I learned how important it is to convey an overview of information in a clear and succinct manner, very different from the more in-depth analysis that graduate students do on a daily basis.  Being in DC provided me with the opportunity to network daily with professionals in related fields, experience the inner workings of the government, and discover numerous other possible career directions after graduation.

These two experiences, in addition to the normal teaching and research, have helped to round out my graduate education.  I learned and honed valuable skills that I may not have had the chance to develop if I had only remained on-campus.  Therefore I suggest you immerse yourself in another experience by taking advantage of internships, courses, field work, study abroad and other off-campus opportunities.  It will broaden your perspective and allow you to come back to your research with fresh eyes.  For many of these experiences the time to apply for next summer is now so act quickly!

Teaching physics with social media

It shouldn’t be surprising to see social media seeping its way into classrooms these days, given its growing diversity and ubiquity.  I had the chance to try social media for a class I team-taught last spring, Physics 106 (Concepts of Physics for Humanities and Social Science Students, also known as “Physics for Poets”).  Previous incarnations of the course have essentially been watered-down versions of the introductory physics courses for pre-med and engineering students.  Along with three other graduate students, this year we completely redesigned the course to focus less on blocks sliding on mysteriously frictionless surfaces, and more on modern, relevant topics like cosmology, energy sustainability, and superconductivity.

We experimented with making social media a major part of the course.  Although this runs the risk of being a mere gimmick, we were committed to social media applications that were really in the best interests of the class.  Since the course is intended for students not pursuing scientific careers, one of our main goals was to stoke the students’ interest and develop their familiarity with popular science media, which is how the students will likely access science for the rest of their lives.  Popular science, like so much media these days, has a major presence on social media, especially Twitter and blogs.  To that end, we incorporated Twitter and blogging into the course.  We created a Twitter feed for the class (@RUPhys106), and several times a week we tweeted links to articles, videos, and websites with cool science content, most of which was directly related to the current course material.  For example, we were able to share this interactive NY Times feature on the hunt for the Higgs boson when we discussed particle physics.  When we talked about protein folding, we tweeted this beautiful blog with art inspired by protein structures.  Out of the approximately 100 students in the class, we accumulated a few dozen followers; we also embedded the feed into our Sakai homepage, which meant students who didn’t use Twitter or didn’t follow us still would see our tweets.

We also had the students write two blogs.  The topics were related to material we covered in class, but that required them to pursue further reading and develop their own take.  The students first posted drafts of these blogs to Sakai through the built-in blogging tool, and then each student had to review two of their peers’ blogs and leave comments.  Using this feedback and additional feedback from the instructors, the students revised their blogs into final drafts.  We were very impressed with the quality of many final blogs; several had the potential to be posted publicly.

Obviously, our use of both Twitter and blogging had direct benefits within the course — the articles and videos linked in our tweets provided content enrichment beyond the lectures, and the blogs required the students to learn to express scientific ideas in their own words.  But beyond these immediate benefits, our hope is that many students have come away with more familiarity and excitement about the outstanding popular science media out there: all the great Twitter feeds, blogs, websites, YouTube channels, etc.  Regardless of whether any of our students remember what wave-particle duality is 10 years from now, if they keep clicking on links about quantum mechanics as much as they do for links on the Kardashians or the world’s 12 cutest animals, our course will have been a success.

Research Tools: Storage, Physical Media Be Gone

Cloud Storage
Cloud Storage

For graduate students, especially those in the sciences who collect a large quantity of data, having a reliable backup source is very important. Furthermore, having access to the data from multiple places makes it easier to complete some tasks. As we conduct our research, apply our hypothesis, and run simulations, we tend to collect this data and may want to keep it for analysis later.

We have gone through multiple types of storage media (Floppy Disks, CDs/DVDs, USB Drives) in the last 2 decades. With each and every one of them there have been advantages and disadvantages. We also had to carry around the storage media and there was always a possibility of the data being corrupted and in some cases unrecoverable. In this post I want to go through 2 cloud storage options a graduate student could encounter and my thoughts on their use. I have found that some students don’t know how cloud storage can benefit them and once they start using it they find it an essential part of their workflow.

Standalone: Dropbox (2 GB free; 500MB per student referral; max 16 GB; paid options)

Dropbox has been a personal favorite of mine for the last 3 or so years. Dropbox is an easy to use cloud storage solution. You setup an account on their website, install their application on whichever platform you use and then you can drop files in the Dropbox Folder and it will sync. Syncing here means that all the places you have installed Dropbox will update their files as you save changes to them. So if you have Dropbox installed on 2 computers, your lab computer and your laptop, and you make and save a change on a file on your laptop, in a few seconds the change will be reflected on your lab computer.

You can also share your dropbox with your lab-mates, advisor, friends and family. This is great when collaborating on a project. Warning: collaborating on a single file together on Dropbox without managing who has access to it and when, can turn tragic: For example, if two people make changes on the the same old version of the same file, save it on Dropbox a few seconds apart, without the second person first opening the version person one has saved then all of person one’s work may be overridden.  Dropbox does have basic version control but one should always be careful with working on a single file with multiple people [link]. Dropbox has been expanding its offering with integration with services from other companies, for example, with Dropbox you can host a simple website with site44 [link]

Integrated Suites: Given the major challenge I pointed out with Dropbox, lets look at some integrated solutions. Integrated in the sense that they provide not just cloud storage but built in tools for editing and collaboration.The big one is Google Docs

Google Docs/Drive (5 GB Free, number of paid options)

Google Docs started as a document creation tool that is completely online. Through time it has evolved into an online storage, creation and collaboration tool. With Google Docs you can create documents, share them with others as well as collaborate on document creation itself too. You can create documents, spreadsheets, presentations, forms etc. You can also import documents you have created elsewhere into the Google format as well as download the documents in a format that you can open in applications on your computer. In April Google relaunched Docs as Google Drive. It now has the same capability as Dropbox, in that you can now sync local documents across computers and share them. Collaboration is the major differentiating feature. Personal tips about the services: When evaluating if the application will be something I use regularly I check if the application has multiple access options. For me having access to my files on a phone, tablet or web is great as I can then open important documents wherever I am. I also store notes that I sometimes create while in transit.

Other Products.  There are numerous other options for cloud storage and/or collaboration. A quick list (not exhaustive):

“Desktop Faculty Development” — the Tomorrow’s Professor Mailing List

One of the best online resources for graduate students, especially those aspiring to academic careers in research or teaching, has to be the Tomorrow’s Professor (TP) mailing list:

http://www.stanford.edu/dept/CTL/Tomprof/index.shtml

Managed by Rick Reis, a professor of engineering at Stanford, the list produces entries twice weekly on a wide variety of topics relevant to graduate students, postdocs, and faculty members, many of which are excerpted from recent journals or books.

I first learned about TP through a colleague who forwarded one of their e-mails regarding teaching. Since then I have been actively reading most of the postings, which I’ve found to be both an outstanding source of advice and a great way to keep abreast of the latest issues in higher education and education research.

Anyone can subscribe to the list to receive the regular e-mails (subscription instructions available on the above URL), although the website contains a full archive of previous posts. There is also a blog that regularly reposts the content:

http://derekbruff.org/blogs/tomprof/